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Visit Colombia Medellin Botero Park a must see

Colombia Medellin Botero Park

Visit Colombia Medellin Botero Park and experience the authentic art of Colombia.

According to Wikipedia, Fernando Botero Angulo (born 19 April 1932) is a Colombian figurative artist and sculptor. Born in Medellín, his signature style, also known as “Boterismo”, depicts people and figures in large, exaggerated volume, which can represent political criticism or humor, depending on the piece. He is considered the most recognized and quoted living artist from Latin America and his art can be found in highly visible places around the world, such as Park Avenue in New York City and the Champs-Élysées in Paris.

All pictures of Colombia Medellin Botero Park and Latin America are taken by Cocotu and belong to cocotu.com. Please ask for permission before using any of these pictures.

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La Paz Bolivia Pictures for Inspiration

Illimani mountain La Paz Bolivia

Check out these pictures of La Paz, Bolivia. La Paz in Bolivia is officially known as Nuestra Señora de La Paz (Spanish), English: ‘Our Lady of Peace’, also known as Chuqi Yapu (Chuquiago) in Aymara, it is the seat of government and the de facto national capital of Bolivia’s Plurinational State (Bolivia’s constitutional capital is Sucre).

With an estimated 789,541 inhabitants in 2015, La Paz is the third most populous city in Bolivia (after Santa Cruz da Serra and El Alto). Its metropolitan area, consisting of La Paz, El Alto and Viacha, is Bolivia’s most populous urban area with a population of 2.3 million. It is also the capital of the La Paz department.

These La Paz Bolivia pictures will inspire you to visit Bolivia.

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2019 NYC Marathon Photos at Brooklyn

NYC Marathon 2019 running chair

On a crisp morning in early November, 50,000 runners from all over the world descended on the 2019 NYC Marathon to traverse the five boroughs on foot, and just as many New Yorkers showed up to cheer them on. The streets of Brooklyn, where I stood among the crowd of onlookers, were bursting with color, pride, and people just being their authentic selves. At times, the bright costumes, creatively worded signs, loud music, and dancers on the sidewalks brought to mind not a high-caliber race, but a giant outdoor party.

The NYC marathon has always been a reminder, to me, of the best of humanity. Runners and spectators alike set aside their work-related anxieties, their ego-driven arguments, and focus on supporting one another, or perhaps something bigger than themselves. Every other runner, it seemed, wore a shirt celebrating a family member, friend, or anyone else who was a survivor of a devastating disease. Even more inspiring to see were some survivors themselves on the course, blazing through with determination in their eyes. I remember a woman whose shirt indicated that she had Parkinson’s; her hands shook ever so slightly as she passed by, but she pumped her arms and held her head high like everyone else while the neon-clad guides next to her smiled on. This display of resilience can teach us an important lesson about the tenacity of the human spirit. Watching the runners, each of whom overcame something to be at the marathon that day, my own personal mountains didn’t seem quite so daunting to climb. If I put my mind to it, I could accomplish anything.

Beyond highlighting the strength of its participants, the NYC marathon undeniably brings out the vibrant character of the city. You’ll see bands playing styles of music you never knew existed, like merengue-rock fusion, that speak to the diversity of the city’s inhabitants. You’ll hear names from every corner of the world (Jorge! Kavita! Sven! Xinyi!) and the word “go!” in so many different languages. You’ll smell sweat, mixed with the aroma of coffee from the little joint around the corner. If you’re a runner, you might taste one of the bananas the lady in the bright tracksuit is handing out. Most of all, you’ll feel inspired.

NYC Marathon 2019
NYC Marathon 2019
NYC Marathon 2019
NYC Marathon 2019 fans
NYC Marathon 2019
NYC Marathon 2019 saxophone kid
NYC Marathon 2019
NYC Marathon 2019 dogs
Banana lady NYC Marathon 2019
Banana lady NYC Marathon 2019
Toenails sign during the marathon
NYC Marathon 2019 Toenails
Turkey guy costume
Turkey guy costume
Running chair during the Marathon
Running chair during the Marathon
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Dominican Republic Coffee Brief History

Dominican Republic coffee Santiago

The island of Hispaniola is split into two parts, Haiti to the west and Dominican Republic to the east. The population of the eastern half of the half, the Spanish-speaking half, is nearly 11 million, and the land area is just under 19,000 square miles. Other than Dominican coffee there are an abundance of economic opportunities in the Dominican Republic. The country today boasts the largest economy in the entire Caribbean. It was here that Christopher Columbus landed in December 1492, encountering the Taino people, who had called the island home since the 600s.

Cuba and Puerto Rico are close by, and to the northwest, swim or fly far enough, you will eventually run into Florida. This is an island nation that is proud of its bustling economy but also recognized worldwide for its idyllic beach scenes that draw in sunbathers and vacationers looking to slow down and enjoy life as it comes.

Climate in The Dominican Republic

The climate is decidedly tropical in Dominican Republic, tropical cyclones hitting the country every couple of years, the majority along the southern coast. From November to January, the west season brings torrential rainfalls, and in the mountainous areas, cold temperatures are possible. Across most of the landscape, though, warm, humid air is the norm. Constanza Valley, Los Haitises National park, the Caribbean Coastal Plain, these are the landscapes you are likely to see printed on a postcard and sold in Santo Domigo.

If you want to see just what Dominican culture stands for, check out the National Palace in the capital. Governed by a strong, multi-party political system, Dominican Republic holds elections every two years and presidential elections every four years, a system that Americans will find familiar.

Dominican Republic History

When the Dominican Republic, then a nation named for its capital as Santo Domino, declared its independence in 1821, unification of the island of Hispaniola was considered an important goal. By 1838, however, opinions had shifted, and Juan Pablo Duarte founded La Trinitaria, a secret society intended to declare an independent Santo Domingo without foreign assistance. This movement was successful, leading to a succession of leaders throughout the 19th century. In 1930 Rafael Trujillo came to power, ruling Santo Domingo autocratically until 1961, at which time Juan Bosch became the first democratically elected president of the island nation in more than three decades.

The story of democracy and representative government in the Dominican Republic is a thrilling one, symbolic of the constant struggle between those who would horde power for themselves and those who would distribute it justly. To visit the Dominican Republic is to experience this history for yourself.

In the mountainous regions of Dominican Republic, arabica coffee dominates the coffee industry, which is based mainly in the highland regions of the island. First introduced to the island in 1715, coffee is today the cropped favored by farmers throughout the country.

You taste Dominican Republic coffee, you play spectator to the history – this is the wonder of being in Dominican Republic, and at the end of it all, take in the beach scenes that the country is famous for!

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Coffee Farmer Video Hard Work in Cusco

Sorting Coffee Beans Manually Idma Peru

A coffee farmer carrying a bag full of dried coffee beans weighting about 45 kilos. It takes great effort to produce a great cup of coffee. Learn more about Latin America culture and coffee at cocotu.com.

Coffee farmer carrying coffee uphill.

Walking on these coffee farms at about 1800 MASL is a blessing. The specialty coffee is run an owned by families that have been living in this region for generations.

High grown coffee from Idma region located in Cusco, Peru. This farm has a river running between it and is super steep as you can see in the video.

Arabica coffee is the specialty in Peru. A top-20 producer of the coffee beans, Peru has a strong reputation for excellent roasts and for ethical sourcing. Whereas other countries have faced criticism for their failure to ensure fair business practices, Peru’s CENFROCAFGE cooperative has united more than 80 farmers’ associations in order to guarantee 92% organic production and 100% Fair Trade certification. Overall, the demand for Peruvian coffee has risen drastically in recent years because of these efforts.

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Dog Coffee Farm in Cusco, Peru happy to see us

Dogs coffee farm Cusco Peru

High grown coffee from Idma region located in Cusco, Peru. Dog from this coffee farm with a river running between it and is super steep as you can see in the video. I kept sliding all the time! You can see the water coming from higher in the mountain.

In Alto Canelon coffee farm in La Convencion province of Cusco. Farm is located at an elevation of about 2,300 meters above sea level. This classifies its coffee as a hight grown coffee. Learn more about Peruvian coffee and culture at this link. More dog coffee farm pictures coming soon.

If you like to try and code with coffee from this Peruvian farm you can grab it using this link.

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Peru Brief History of and Peruvian Coffee

Quillabamba Peru Mountains

Situated on the western coast of South America, Peru is home to more than 32 million people, nearly half of whom are of Amerindian descent. The country takes up almost 500,000 square miles of land, land that is recognized globally for its ability to sustain crops and for its picture-perfect quality that year after year tends to draw in tourists in droves. The climate is extremely varied, and there are areas where the temperatures can be moderate and even cold at times. In Peru, the Amazon is a place where the rain falls often and in large amounts, the sun beating down relentlessly as well, creating an environment that is at once wet and warm. There are extreme lows and extreme highs, both valleys and mountains, and because Peru sits at the crossroads of two ocean currents, diversity is the norm.

Quillabamba coffee region in Cusco Peru
Quillabamba coffee region in Cusco Peru

Bordering Ecuador, Colombia, Brazil, Bolivia, and Chile, Peru is a country that is easily accessible essentially no matter where you happen to be on the continent. Manu National Park is famous as a biosphere reserve, and in Huascaran National Park, the mountains rise high into the sky to create sights that are just breathtaking.

Coffee varieties in Peru

Arabica coffee is the specialty in Peru. A top-20 producer of the coffee beans, Peru has a strong reputation for excellent roasts and for ethical sourcing. Whereas other countries have faced criticism for their failure to ensure fair business practices, Peru’s CENFROCAFGE cooperative has united more than 80 farmers’ associations in order to guarantee 92% organic production and 100% Fair Trade certification. Overall, the demand for Peruvian coffee has risen drastically in recent years because of these efforts.

Coffee cherries at Latin America coffee farm
Coffee cherries at Latin America coffee farm

The Nore Chico Civilization thrived on the Peruvian coast around 5,000 years ago, and in the 15th century, the Inca created the largest empire in pre-Columbian America, basing their capital in Cusco. The Spanish did not conquer present-day Peru until 1572, after which the indigenous population fell sharply. One of the last royalist countries in South America, Peru remained largely loyal to Spain until the 1820s. Sites of the former Incan Empire in Peru are a major draw for tourists who want to experience firsthand the wonders of pre-Columbian America. The legacy of the Incas lives on in the statues and artifacts they left behind. Continuing to shape the country’s culture, much to the delight of those who take the time to see Peru completely.

There is always something else to do in Peru, always some new sight to take in, great fun in Lima, fascinating history in Cusco. To be there is to comprehend on a higher level that civilization really did develop over time: it didn’t just pop up out of nowhere. Take in a cup of Peruvian Coffee and see it for yourself!